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Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are unhealthy and abnormal eating habits that can threaten your health or even your life.  They are serious but treatable illnesses.  They can affect people of every age, gender, sex, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic group.  The most common eating disorders are anorexia nervosa: a dangerous restriction of eating and concern about body shape and weight, bulimia nervosa: eating excessive amounts of food and then purging, binge eating: out of control eating patterns without purging, and AFRID, avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder: limiting the amount and/or types of food consumed. 


Articles/Fact Sheets:

 
This article with video excerpts by Dr. Cynthia Bulk explores myths and realities related to Eating Disorders.
 
This article covers signs and symptoms of the major Eating Disorders: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating. It also explores risk factors, treatments, and resources.
 
This article highlights that 1 in 3 people who suffer from eating disorders are male.  It discusses some possible causes and suggests a gender sensitive approach to responding to this population.
 
This article illustrates key facts about men and eating disorders. 
 
This article and accompanying video, details a complete list of symptoms and warning signs that indicate possible Eating Disorders for early intervention. It also includes a national helpline number.
 
This article addresses the many different types of people that eating disorders effect beyond stereotypes. Included are links and sub articles that provide information about marginalized populations such as people of color, LGBT+, men/boys, and older adults.
 
This article assists parents, family members, and friends to support someone with an eating disorder.
 
This article provides ideas on how to talk with and help a loved one with an eating disorder.

Websites:

 
This webpage discusses types of eating disorders and some of the causes of these disorders. It further details who typically suffers from eating disorders and why treatment is important for recovery. It is supported by the National Institute of Mental Health.

Videos:
 

Elizabeth Huh shares her story of battling anorexia and offers her perspective on how others can recover.
 
Eating Disorders Have No Face
Jazz McCutcheon discusses her eating disorder and her journey of recovery. She explains that eating disorders do not have one look or type, and how to provide support to individuals with eating disorders.